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Re: Amiga netbook?
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@samo79

Quote:
... netbook will be sold, just for mostly coders, who want to do their work while they not at home.


I use a Windows laptop for that--specifically, a MacBook Pro running Windows 7. Why wait for a portable platform that went out of style three Christmases ago when any old laptop will do?

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Re: Stuck in deconstructor??
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Are you mixing pthreads with C++? The OS4 C++ libraries aren't thread safe, and this is one of problems you'll encounter. I had a similar issue when porting iperf, but rather than figure out the problem, I disabled threads. There isn't much point to debugging issues related to libstdc++ on OS4. They're not likely to be fixed any time soon.

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Re: sockets suck...
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@alfkil

80/tcp is the standard port, but it's not the only port. You might want to start with a text on TCP/IP. Like UNIX Network Programming, W. Richard Stevens's TCP/IP Illustrated, Volume 1 is the bible. Volume 1 introduces and describes TCP/IP. Volume 2 describes a complete implementation based on 4.4BSD-Lite. (Incidentally, Olaf Barthel wrote Roadshow, the IP stack in AmigaOS 4.x, using this volume as a guide.) Volume 3 describe several protocols, some common, some not so common.

Internet sockets are used by the majority of operating systems to provide access to the system's IP stack. If you want to use HTTP over TCP/IP on any mainstream system, it would be helpful to have at least a basic understanding of both IP and sockets. After that, a detailed understanding of HTTP would be more than beneficial.

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Re: I2C port with Amiga OS 4.x
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@Hans

Weren't we supposed to get an I2C interface out of the work being done to support DDC in display drivers? Did that end up being specific to the display subsystem?

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Re: ARexx books
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@angelheart

I'm not sure those books will add much that readily available sources don't already provide. The official ARexx manual is a good source of information, it's included with every copy of Workbench / AmigaOS, and it covers all the ARexx-specific bits.

The REXX Language: A Practical Approach to Programming by Mike Cowlishaw is the book on REXX, but don't buy a new copy. It's an expensive facsimile. You can find a PDF copy of the book (probably a prepublication draft distributed by the author) on several REXX web sites. You can also find a draft copy of the ANSI REXX standard here: http://www.rexxla.org/rexxlang/standards/.

IBM still sponsors and supports the REXX language on its own operating systems, and almost everything IBM has ever published is available for free in their online library. IBM Redbooks are a treasure trove of knowledge, on many subjects.

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Re: How fast is AmigaOS at executing programs?
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@Deniil

I can tell you that under MSYS/MinGW, your loop produces unique output every ~56 occurrences, which corresponds to a Windows (PC clock) tick of ~18 ms. Without further evidence to the contrary, I would say the Bash while loop executes every tick, regardless of system speed. Variations would be caused by outside factors. So, ignore my comments about Cygwin as they don't apply in this case. (Cygwin is in fact slower than MinGW and other Windows-native APIs, which is particularly noticeable when making large projects like GCC.)

Linux should have a default tick of 1 ms (1000 Hz). You may have changed the tick rate in your kernel, or Bash (or whatever shell you're using) may behave differently on your system.

EDIT: My point here is the question you're actually answering with your experiment is, "What is the iteration rate of a Bash while-loop?"

EDIT2: I'm beginning to sound like a Windows pundit (and really, I am), but a similar construct using a batch file, a custom date command, and a port of BSD's uniq produces unique output ~420 times per second. Another similar construct using JScript produces unique output ~520 times per second. Again, it's entirely dependent on how quickly your host environment, i.e. your shell, can spawn processes, not your operating system.


Edited by Trev on 2010/10/8 19:09:49
Edited by Trev on 2010/10/8 21:50:01
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Re: How fast is AmigaOS at executing programs?
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@Deniil

For what it's worth, MSYS/MinGW is *much* faster than Cygwin. Use it if you can. There's something about Cygwin's implementation of fork, spawn, et al that causes huge delays. EDIT: I.e. The delays are caused by Cygwin, not Windows.

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